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12/7/12  

Vice Admiral Sir Charles Montgomery Chief of Naval Personnel andTraining and Second Sea Lord 

Visited the
Fleet Air Arm Memorial Church with his wife Adrienne.











11/11/11

Archibishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, visited St Bart's for RNAS Yeovilton's 2011 Armistice Day Service (see article on right)


abc










 

 Fleet Air Arm Memorial Church Marks 20th Anniversary

Friday 15 November 2013 saw some 150 members, past and present, of the Fleet Air Arm family gather at Saint Bartholomew's to mark 20 years since its official dedication as the Fleet Air Arm Memorial Church.

 

Amongst those attending the special Service of Remembrance, Celebration and Thanksgiving were the First Sea Lord and former pilot, Admiral George Zambellas KCB DSC ADC, Lady Elizabeth Gass JP, Lord Lieutenant of Somerset and Rear Admiral Sir Donald Gosling KCVO who continues to be a generous benefactor of Saint Bartholomew's. Joining the numerous dignitaries that filled the whole Nave were Fleet Air Arm representatives from all ranks including many from the Royal Navy Air Stations at Yeovilton and Culdrose, as well as personnel from the Search and Rescue Flight at HMS Gannett in Scotland.

 

The Address was given by The Chaplain of the Fleet, The Reverend Scott J Brown QHC BD, in which he said, 'Today is about commemoration, thanksgiving and even celebration. Commemorating those from the Fleet Air Arm who have paid the ultimate sacrifice in the service of their country in the cause of liberty and peace. As our Gospel lesson reminds us greater love has no one than this, that one lay down ones life for one’s friends.

The Reverend Brown also acknowledged the Humanitarian disaster relief effort taking place in the Philippines that the Fleet Air Arm is assisting with adding; 'In your remembering, you desire as a Fleet Air Arm community to bring light where there is darkness, a beacon of hope where there may be despair. In the next few days the helicopter Flight embarked onboard HMS DARING will do just that in real and practical ways, demonstrating Christian values which stand the test of time.



Baptism in Yeovilton Weir

Photos here

In what has proved to be an exciting week for the Fleet Air Arm Memorial Church with Olympic bells, a wedding and the baptism of little Lola Hendra, today saw yet another highlight in the life of the Church.

In a special ceremony that has been practiced for over two thousand years, Royal Naval Chaplain The Reverend Tudor Botwood Royal Navy, Baptist Minister and Chaplaincy Team Leader at RNAS Yeovilton, baptised Air Engineer Technician Andrew Bell of 815 Naval Air Squadron.

Although not a rare occurrence this is a first for RNAS Yeovilton. Reverend Tudor Botwood explains, “Baptists love baptising outdoors. There’s something nice about being out in Gods creation. There’s something really special about baptising in a river - by a weir is always interesting because you’re worried sick that your foot will slip and you’ll go careering down-stream!”

Despite a typical British Summers day, overcast with showers, spirits were high amongst the curious and the devoted that came to see the full-immersion baptism of AET Bell, who was being baptised 3 weeks before his wedding to his fiancée Monica Urban, in near by Yeovil. Any nerves on his part were soon dismissed as the Royal Naval Chaplain showed Andy the drill.

Tudor is an old hand at Baptising personnel in the Navy. When he was the Chaplain at 42 Commando Royal Marines he was asked to baptise a Royal Marine in Bickleigh Vale, at the bottom of a very deep gorge on Dartmoor. On that occasion the river was in speight and he had to post safety swimmers down-stream in case the fast flow took the newly baptised Marine away. Luckily on this occasion there was only a gentle flowing mill stream to contend with.

Andy said, “It was good, it was a bit cold when we first went in but it soon warmed up. It was quite liberating. I did wonder if I was going to come back up, it seemed such a long time under water.”

The baptism took place at the weir in Yeovilton village, a deep flowing conference of the River Yeo that would normally be the scene for picnics and rambler’s enjoying the beautiful South Somerset countryside and walking along the river paths and levels.

In what has proved to be an exciting week for the Fleet Air Arm Memorial Church with Olympic bells, a wedding and the baptism of little Lola Hendra, today saw yet another highlight in the life of the Church.

In a special ceremony that has been practiced for over two thousand years, Royal Naval Chaplain The Reverend Tudor Botwood Royal Navy, Baptist Minister and Chaplaincy Team Leader at RNAS Yeovilton, baptised Air Engineer Technician Andrew Bell of 815 Naval Air Squadron.

Although not a rare occurrence this is a first for RNAS Yeovilton. Reverend Tudor Botwood explains, “Baptists love baptising outdoors. There’s something nice about being out in Gods creation. There’s something really special about baptising in a river - by a weir is always interesting because you’re worried sick that your foot will slip and you’ll go careering down-stream!”

Despite a typical British Summers day, overcast with showers, spirits were high amongst the curious and the devoted that came to see the full-immersion baptism of AET Bell, who was being baptised 3 weeks before his wedding to his fiancée Monica Urban, in near by Yeovil. Any nerves on his part were soon dismissed as the Royal Naval Chaplain showed Andy the drill.

Tudor is an old hand at Baptising personnel in the Navy. When he was the Chaplain at 42 Commando Royal Marines he was asked to baptise a Royal Marine in Bickleigh Vale, at the bottom of a very deep gorge on Dartmoor. On that occasion the river was in speight and he had to post safety swimmers down-stream in case the fast flow took the newly baptised Marine away. Luckily on this occasion there was only a gentle flowing mill stream to contend with.

Andy said, “It was good, it was a bit cold when we first went in but it soon warmed up. It was quite liberating. I did wonder if I was going to come back up, it seemed such a long time under water.”

The baptism took place at the weir in Yeovilton village, a deep flowing conference of the River Yeo that would normally be the scene for picnics and rambler’s enjoying the beautiful South Somerset countryside and walking along the river paths and levels.

In what has proved to be an exciting week for the Fleet Air Arm Memorial Church with Olympic bells, a wedding and the baptism of little Lola Hendra, today saw yet another highlight in the life of the Church.

In a special ceremony that has been practiced for over two thousand years, Royal Naval Chaplain The Reverend Tudor Botwood Royal Navy, Baptist Minister and Chaplaincy Team Leader at RNAS Yeovilton, baptised Air Engineer Technician Andrew Bell of 815 Naval Air Squadron.

Although not a rare occurrence this is a first for RNAS Yeovilton. Reverend Tudor Botwood explains, “Baptists love baptising outdoors. There’s something nice about being out in Gods creation. There’s something really special about baptising in a river - by a weir is always interesting because you’re worried sick that your foot will slip and you’ll go careering down-stream!”

Despite a typical British Summers day, overcast with showers, spirits were high amongst the curious and the devoted that came to see the full-immersion baptism of AET Bell, who was being baptised 3 weeks before his wedding to his fiancée Monica Urban, in near by Yeovil. Any nerves on his part were soon dismissed as the Royal Naval Chaplain showed Andy the drill.

Tudor is an old hand at Baptising personnel in the Navy. When he was the Chaplain at 42 Commando Royal Marines he was asked to baptise a Royal Marine in Bickleigh Vale, at the bottom of a very deep gorge on Dartmoor. On that occasion the river was in speight and he had to post safety swimmers down-stream in case the fast flow took the newly baptised Marine away. Luckily on this occasion there was only a gentle flowing mill stream to contend with.

Andy said, “It was good, it was a bit cold when we first went in but it soon warmed up. It was quite liberating. I did wonder if I was going to come back up, it seemed such a long time under water.”

The baptism took place at the weir in Yeovilton village, a deep flowing conference of the River Yeo that would normally be the scene for picnics and rambler’s enjoying the beautiful South Somerset countryside and walking along the river paths and levels.




 'All the Bells'


                                           Friday 27 July

The Bells at the Royal Naval Air Station at Yeovilton rang out as part of the “All the Bells” project taking place simultaneously across the country as part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad. At 0812 precisely bells at the Fleet Air Arm Memorial Church in Yeovilton village, the Air Station church, St Augustine’s, and HMS Heron's ships bell were all rung non stop for three minutes.

Ashore and afloat the Royal Navy and the Royal Fleet Auxiliary participated across the UK and overseas. Even Big Ben got involved and was rung 40 times over the three minutes.

Chaplaincy team leader at RNAS Yeovilton Chaplain Tudor Botwood said, “It’s a wonderful project that unites the country and the Royal Navy. Yeovilton has certainly taken up the challenge and it was brilliant to hear the church bells rung so early in the morning.”

More here!


Concert:
Thursday 12 July 2012

The planned programme of the second in our series of concerts rained off, so sadly there was no Beat Retreat. We were, however, treated to an excellent concert.  Again we were filled to capacity and the nibbles were once more a triumph!  £750  was raised and this has been divided between the FAA Memorial Church and the Royal Naval Royal Marines Charity.

More photos here.

Falklands 30 Commemoration Service
Thursday 14 June 2012


Commemoration of the Falkland Islands' Conflict and Dedication of the Aircrewman's Association StandardAttended by over 150 veterans including His Royal Highness, Prince Andrew Duke of York, the service also raised approximately £566 for Combat Stress.

Photos here  . . .  here   . . . and here

Local News Coverage here

 

Bishop of Taunton visits RNAS Yeovilton 

13 June 2012

Photo here

The Right Reverend Peter Maurice made a short visit to the Royal Naval Air Station at Yeovilton while touring the general area of South Somerset. He showed great interest in the work of Royal Naval Chaplaincy on the base and discussed with the team what lessons could be drawn from it for the wider Church.

The Station is one of the busiest military airfields in the United Kingdom and is amongst the largest in Europe, normally housing eight squadrons and around one hundred aircraft of varying types. It is also the biggest aviation establishment in the Royal Navy, employing over 4300 service personnel and civilians to operate and support squadrons, and to provide the many facilities required to run a Naval Air Station.

He dined in the Wardroom with the Chaplains before meeting Commodore Paul Chivers OBE, the Commanding Officer of the base.

“The Bishop hasn’t visited us in years and it’s nice to see him. We value his interest in our work.” Said Rev Tudor Botwood.


Castle Cary Choir Candlelit Concert
12 May 2012

The Fleet Air Arm Memorial Church saw it's first in a planned series of concerts held on Friday 23 March 2012. Castle Cary Choir entertained the audience superbly by candlelight witha range of music and songs from the past and present. The proceeds from the concert, a grand total of £784.16 will be put towards the cost of a sound system for the church. Many thanks to our raffle sponsors, Haynes Motor Museum, Fleet Air Arm Museum, The Ilchester Arms and Claire & Jonathan Coulson.


Photos here.

The Archbishop of Canterbury visits St. Bart's:

Friday 11th November 2011


Photos here.


On Armistice Day 2011, Archbishop Rowan Williams joined Sailors and Royal Marines from the Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton for the annual Act of Remembrance in the churchyard of St. Bartholomew’s Fleet Air Arm Memorial Church.

Dr William’s watched as platoons of RNAS Yeovilton service personnel marched across the airfield and took their places for the Service in the grounds of the spiritual home of the Fleet Air Arm.


Commodore Paul Chivers OBE,  Commanding Officer RNAS Yeovilton said:

“No matter how busy we all are, we need to reflect on the sacrifices made by all of our Service personnel over the years and today we also remember those closer to home, here at RNAS Yeovilton. Squadrons and departments from the Air Station provide ever-increasing numbers of personnel for front-line, operational tasks and servicemen and women from Yeovilton are here today, to commemorate those who have lost their lives, not only in two World Wars, but also in more recent and current conflicts.”


During the Service, the Royal Navy and Royal Marines Roll of Honour was read out by the Base Warrant Officer, Warrant Officer 1 Steve Uzzell and detailed all Royal Naval and Royal Marine personnel who have lost their lives from 2010 to the present day. The Act of Remembrance was led by Reverend Tudor Botwood and Reverend Ned Kelly from RNAS Yeovilton and following the 2 minute silence Commodore Chivers laid a wreath.

Taking the text that “No one has greater love than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends” the Archbishop spoke in his sermon of the “generous risks” being taken by the Armed Forces to make friends of strangers.

He said: “in the last ten years or so, the experience of those serving in the Armed Forces of the Crown has been, again and again, taking risks for the sake of strangers.  People have been sent to distant parts of the globe, to unfamiliar cultures locked in quarrels and conflicts about which we know very little.  The Armed Forces have been asked to go to those places, and take exactly the same risks that they would take for comrades, for family, for country.  What has become one of the most complex but also one of the most extraordinary things about military service in our own generation is that our forces have taken risks for the sake of strangers. 

They have taken risks not because people are friends, but in order that they might become friends.  Our Forces have been at work, not only in the great theatres of Iraq and Afghanistan but in many other places too, in order to make friends - in order to build harmony and trust between peoples in an age of deep anxiety and instability. Friendship doesn’t just happen, it happens when we sense in somebody else someone we can trust.  And there can be no greater token of trustworthiness than being willing to take risks. 

So for our servicemen and women who go and take these massive mortal risks in distant places for people we might regard as strangers, that is one of the most effective tools there could be of building friendship.  We show we are willing to take risks, even for those we don’t know, so that they may become friends, so that there may be harmony.  And that requires an enormous and unusual level of commitment.  Commitment to a vision of a world that might be, and is not yet.  A world where it’s possible for every stranger to become a friend.  It requires a deep vision of what human beings may become, and are not yet.”


As a poignant reminder of the sacrifices that have been made by members of the Fleet Air Arm, the Swordfish aircraft from the Royal Navy Historic Flight flew past the churchyard as the bugler finished the Last Post.















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